Richard I of England

Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England from 6 July 1189 until his death. He also ruled asDuke of Normandy (as Richard IV), Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Lord of CyprusCount of PoitiersCount of AnjouCount of MaineCount of Nantes, and Overlord of Brittany at various times during the same period. He was the third of five sons of King Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. He was known as Richard Cœur de Lion orRichard the Lionheart because of his reputation as a great military leader and warrior.[1] The Muslims called himMelek-Ric (King Richard) or Malek al-Inkitar (King of England).[2] He was also known in Occitan as Oc e No (Yes and No), because of his reputation for terseness.[3]

By the age of 16, Richard had taken command of his own army, putting down rebellions in Poitou against his father.[1]Richard was a central Christian commander during the Third Crusade, leading the campaign after the departure ofPhilip II of France and scoring considerable victories against his Muslim counterpart, Saladin, although he did not retake Jerusalem from Saladin.[4]

Richard spoke langue d’oïl, a French dialect, and Occitan, a Romance language spoken in southern France and nearby regions.[5] Born in England, where he spent his childhood, he lived for most of his adult life before becoming king in his Duchy of Aquitaine in the southwest of France. Following his accession he spent very little time, perhaps as little as six months, in England, preferring to use his kingdom as a source of revenue to support his armies.[6]Nevertheless, he was seen as a pious hero by his subjects.[7] He remains one of the few kings of England remembered by his epithet, rather than regnal number, and is an enduring iconic figure both in England and in France.[8]

In engineering, a truss is a structure that “consists of two-force members only, where the members are organized so that the assemblage as a whole behaves as a single object”.[1] A “two-force member” is a structural component where force is only applied to two points. Although this rigorous definition allows the members to have any shape connected in any stable configuration, trusses typically comprise five or more triangular units constructed with straight members whose ends are connected at joints referred to as nodes. In this typical context, external forces and reactions to those forces are considered to act only at the nodes and result in forces in the members which are either tensile or compressive forces. For straight members, moments (torques) are explicitly excluded because, and only because, all the joints in a truss are treated as revolutes, as is necessary for the links to be two-force members.

A planar truss is one where all the members and nodes lie within a two dimensional plane, while a space truss has members and nodes extending into three dimensions. The top beams in a truss are called top chords and are generally in compression, the bottom beams are called bottom chords and are generally intension, the interior beams are called webs, and the areas inside the webs are called panels.[2]

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